Oceanography Questions
Duxbury Chapter 9

  1. What is the thermocline?
    The coldest part of the ocean
    The hottest part of the ocean
    The zone of greatest heat loss
    The zone of greatest salinity change
    The zone of greatest temperature change

  2. What primarily drives the surface ocean currents?
    Coriolis forces
    Deep sea vents
    Density differences between water bodies
    Rotation of the earth
    Winds

  3. What primarily drives the deep ocean currents?
    Coriolis forces
    Deep sea vents
    Density differences between water bodies
    Rotation of the earth
    Winds

  4. How long does it take surface water to cross an ocean basin?
    About a hundred years
    About a thousand years
    About five years
    About thirty years
    About three months

  5. How long does it take deep water to cross an ocean basin?
    About a hundred years
    About a thousand years
    About five years
    About thirty years
    About three months

  6. In most ocean basins, how does surface water circulate?
    In circulates CCW in the northern hemisphere and CW in the southern hemisphere
    In circulates CW in the northern hemisphere and CCW in the southern hemisphere
    It circulates clockwise (CW) in both hemispheres
    It circulates counterclockwise (CCW) in both hemispheres
    There is no general pattern, and each ocean behaves completely differently

  7. Where are the major ocean basins most connected to one another such that substantial water is exchanged between them?
    Around Antarctica
    At the North Pole
    Near the equator
    Throughout the northern hemisphere
    Throughout the southern hemisphere

  8. Which statement characterizes the Gulf Stream?
    Cold water moving south along the east coast of North America
    Cold water moving south along the west coast of Europe and Africa
    Warm water moving east along the equator
    Warm water moving north and east across the north Atlantic
    Warm water moving north and west into the Caribbean Sea

  9. What is the nature of eddies that move north of the Gulf Stream?
    They are cold, deep, and spin counter-clockwise.
    They are cold, shallow, and spin clockwise.
    They are cold, shallow, and spin counter-clockwise.
    They are warm, shallow, and spin clockwise.
    They are warm, shallow, and spin counter-clockwise.

  10. What is the nature of eddies that move south of the Gulf Stream?
    They are cold, deep, and spin counter-clockwise.
    They are cold, shallow, and spin clockwise.
    They are cold, shallow, and spin counter-clockwise.
    They are warm, shallow, and spin clockwise.
    They are warm, shallow, and spin counter-clockwise.

  11. Where does deep upwelling usually occur?
    In the middle of the oceans
    Near continents
    Near the equator
    Near the poles
    Near trenches

  12. Under what conditions does coastal upwelling commonly occur?
    Only on the eastern coasts of continents
    Only on the western coasts of continents
    Only where biotic productivity is high enough to sustain it
    Where winds blow away from shore or Ekman flow carries surface water away from shore
    Where winds blow toward shore or Ekman flow carries surface water toward shore

  13. Match each term with its definition.
    Term Definition
    Boundary currents
    Ekman spiral
    Equatorial upwelling
    Geostrophic Current
    Langmuir Circulation
    North or south circulation along continental margins
    Shallow circulation cells parallel to wind direction
    The piling up of water in large ocean gyres
    The predicted motion of water water at different depths
    Vertical circulation due to surface divergence

  14. Which currents are warm compared with surrounding ocean waters?
    Coastal upwelling currents
    Deep upwelling currents
    Eastern boundary currents
    Equatorial counter currents
    Western boundary currents

  15. Which ocean has circulation that is highly seasonal?
    Arctic Ocean
    Atlantic Ocean
    Indian Ocean
    Pacific Ocean
    Western boundary currents

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