Publications

Publications and Abstracts by Dr. Heaton

Pauli, J. N., Moss, W. E., Manlick, P. J., Fountain, E. D., Kirby, R., Sultaire, S. M., Perrig, P. L., Mendoza, J. E., Pokallus, J. W., Heaton, T. H. 2015. Examining the uncertain origin and management role of martens on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. Conservation Biology, vol. 29, no 5, pp. 1257-1267.

Dixon, E. J., Heaton, T. H., Lee, C. L., Fifield, T. E., Coltrain, J. B., Kemp, B. M., Owsley, D. W., Parrish, E., Turner, C. G., Edgar, H. J. H., Worl, R. K., Smith, D. G., Farmer, G. L. 2014. Evidence of Maritime Adaptation and Coastal Migration from Southeast Alaska. pp. 537-548 in Owsley, D. W., and Jantz, R. L. (eds.) Kennewick Man: The Scientific Investigation of an Ancient American Skeleton, Texas A&M University Press, 669 p.

Kemp, B. M., Malhi, R. S., McDonough, J., Bolnick, D. A., Eshleman, J. A., Richards, O., Martinez-Labarga, C., Johnson, J. R., Lorenz, J. G., Dixon, E. J., Fifield, T. E., Heaton, T. H., Worl, R., Smith, D. G. 2007. Genetic analysis of early holocene skeletal remains from Alaska and its implications for the settlement of the Americas. American Journal of Physical Anthropology, vol. 132, no. 4, pp. 605-621.

Heaton, T. H., Grady, F. 2007. The Vertebrate Fossil Record of On Your Knees Cave, Prince of Wales Island, Southeast Alaska. Quaternary International, vol. 167-168 Supplement, p. 160.

Heaton, T. H. 2007. Diverse Avifaunas from Coastal Caves in Southeast Alaska. Current Research in the Pleistocene, vol. 24, pp. 12-13.

Heaton, T. H., Grady, F. 2005. An update on vertebrate fossil research in caves of Southeast Alaska. Journal of Cave and Karst Studies, vol. 67, no. 3, p. 195.

Heaton, T. H. 2005. Fossil mammals as climate proxies in Southeast Alaska. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, vol. 37, no. 5, p. 36.

Fedje, D. W., Mackie, Q. X., Dixon, E. J., Heaton, T. H. 2004. Late Wisconsin environments and archaeological visibility on the northern Northwest Coast. Chapter 4 (pp. 97-138) in Madsen, D. B. (ed.), Entering America: Northeast Asia and Beringia before the Last Glacial Maximum, University of Utah Press.

Heaton, T. H., Grady, F. 2004. Detailed vertebrate history of Southeast Alaska during the Last Glacial Maximum. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, vol. 24, no. 3, p. 69A.

Heaton, T. H., Grady, F. 2003b. The Late Pleistocene sea bird fauna of On Your Knees Cave, Southeast Alaska. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, vol. 23, no. 3, p. 60A.

Heaton, T. H., Grady, F. 2003a. The Late Wisconsin vertebrate history of Prince of Wales Island, Southeast Alaska. Chapter 2 (pp. 17-53) in Schubert, B. W., Mead, J. I., and Graham, R. W. (eds.) Ice Age Cave Faunas of North America, Indiana University Press.

Heaton, T. H. 2003. The southern expansion of the North American Arctic Mammal Fauna during the Last Glacial Maximum. P. 20 in Matheus, P., Sher, A. (eds.) Impacts of Late Quaternary Climate Change on Western Arctic Shelf Lands: Insights from the Terrestrial Mammal Record. International Arctic Research Center, University of Alaska Fairbanks.

Dorale, J. A., Heaton, T. H., Edwards, R. L. 2003. U-Th dating of fossil-associated cave calcites from southeastern Alaska. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, vol. 35, no. 6, p. 334.

Heaton, T. H. 2002c. The vertebrate paleontology and paleoecology of Prince of Wales Island, Southeast Alaska over the last 50,000 years. American Quaternary Association Programs and Abstracts of the 17th Biennial Meeting, pp. 54-56.

Heaton, T. H. 2002b. The Ice Age animal history of Southeast Alaska. Society for American Archaeology, Abstracts of the 67th Annual Meeting, p. 136.

Heaton, T. H. 2002a. Late Quaternary vertebrate fossils from the outer islands of southern Southeast Alaska. Current Research in the Pleistocene, vol. 19, pp. 102-104.

Heaton, T. H., Grady, F. 2002. The biostratigraphy of On Your Knees Cave, northern Prince of Wales Island, Southeast Alaska. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, vol. 22, no. 3, p. 63A.

Heaton, T. H. 2001c. Late Pleistocene and Holocene vertebrates from the Southeast Alaskan mainland. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, vol. 21, no. 3, pp. 59A-60A.

Heaton, T. H. 2001b. Whale remains from Puffin Grotto, a raised sea cave on Noyes Island, Southeast Alaska. South Dakota Academy of Science Proceedings, vol. 80, p. 409.

Heaton, T. H. 2001a. Late Pleistocene and Holocene Vertebrates from Cave Deposits near Wrangell, Alaska. Current Research in the Pleistocene, vol. 18, pp. 101-103.

Heaton, T. H. 2000. Climatic conditions during the Last Glacial Maximum in coastal Alaska as seen from fossil vertebrates of Prince of Wales Island. Arctic Workshop 2000 Abstracts, University of Colorado at Boulder, pp. 82-83.

Heaton, T. H., Grady, F. 2000. Vertebrate biogeography, climate change, and Ice Age coastal refugia in southeastern Alaska. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, vol. 20, no. 3, 48A.

Heaton, T. H., Grady, F. 1999. Late Quaternary birds and fishes from On Your Knees Cave, Prince of Wales Island, Southeast Alaska. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, vol. 19, no. 3, pp. 50A.

Heaton, T. H., Grady, F. 1998b. Quaternary artiodactyls of the Alexander Archipelago, southeast Alaska. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 49A-50A.

Heaton, T. H., Grady, F. 1998a. Ice Age biochronology of Southeast Alaska from 49-PET-408. Alaska Anthropological Association 25th Annual Meeting Abstracts with Program, pp. 13-14.

Heaton, T. H. 1998. Ten years makes a difference. The Alaskan Caver, vol. 18, no 1 & 2, pp. 1-2.

Dixon, E. J., Heaton, T. H., Fifield, T. E., Hamilton, T. D., Putnam, D. E., Grady, F. 1997. Late Quaternary regional geoarchaeology of Southeast Alaska karst: a progress report. Geoarchaeology, vol. 12, no. 6, pp. 689-712.

Heaton, T. H., Grady, F. 1997. The preliminary Late Wisconsin mammalian biochronology of Prince of Wales Island, southeastern Alaska. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, vol. 17, no. 3, 52A.

Champe, K. B., Heaton, T. H. 1996. Stable isotope values for two modern black bears from Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. South Dakota Academy of Science Proceedings, vol. 75.

Heaton, T. H., Talbot, S. L., Shields, G. F. 1996. An Ice Age Refugium for Large Mammals in the Alexander Archipelago, Southeastern Alaska. Quaternary Research, vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 186-192.

Heaton, T. H. 1996d. The Late Wisconsin vertebrate fauna of On Your Knees Cave, northern Prince of Wales Island, southeast Alaska. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, vol. 16, no. 3, p. 40A-41A.

Heaton, T. H. 1996c. Questions arise because of fossil remains in the Alexander Archipelago. The Alaskan Caver, vol. 16, no. 1, pp. 1-2.

Heaton, T. H. 1996b. Southeast Alaska: the Fossil Gold Mine. National Speleological Society News, vol. 54, no. 7, pp. 172-175.

Heaton, T. H., Love, D. C., 1995. The 1994 excavation of a Quaternary vertebrate fossil deposit from Bumper Cave, Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. Geological Society of America Abstracts with Programs, vol. 27, no. 3, p. 57.

Heaton, T. H. 1995d. Colonization of southeast Alaska by Ursus arctos prior to the peak of Wisconsin glaciation. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, vol. 15, no. 3, 34A.

Heaton, T. H. 1995c. Interpretation of §13C values from vertebrate remains of the Alexander Archipelago, southeast Alaska. Current Research in the Pleistocene, vol. 12, pp. 95-97.

Heaton, T. H. 1995b. Middle Wisconsin bear and rodent remains discovered on Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. Current Research in the Pleistocene, vol. 12, pp. 92-95.

Grady, F., Heaton, T. H. 1994b. Paleontological discoveries in Caves of Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. Journal of Cave and Karst Studies, vol. 56, no. 2, p. 56.

Heaton, T. H. 1994b. Variation in fossil and modern Ursus arctos from Alaska. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, vol. 14, no. 3, 28A.

Heaton, T. H., Grady, F. 1993. Fossil grizzly bears (Ursus arctos) from Prince of Wales Island, Alaska, offer new insights into animal dispersal, interspecific competition, and age of deglaciation. Current Research in the Pleistocene, vol. 10, pp. 98-100.

Heaton, T. H., Grady, F. 1992b. Two species of bear found in late Pleistocene/early Holocene den in El Capitan Cave, Prince of Wales Island, southern Alaska coast. Journal of Vertebrate Paleontology, vol. 12, no. 3, p. 32A.

Heaton, T. H., Grady, F. 1992a. Preliminary report on the fossil bears of El Capitan Cave, Prince of Wales Island, Alaska. Current Research in the Pleistocene, vol. 9, pp. 97-99.

Magazine Articles on the Research

Ice Age: South Dakotan charts the past with tools of the future, SDPB Magazine, June 2015, pp. 4-5, by Ruth Bylander.

Who were the First Americans?, Time, March 13, 2006, vol. 167, no. 11, pp. 44-52, by Michael D. Lemonick and Andrea Dorfman.

Exploring the Northwest Coast: E. James Dixon and the peopling of the New World, Mammoth Trumpet, September 2005, vol. 20, no. 4, pp. 11-13, by Floyd B. Largent, Jr.

Caveman DNA hints at map of migration, Nature, July 4, 2005, vol. 436, no. 7048, p. 162, by Rex Dalton.

Out there: buried treasure, Forest, Winter 2005, vol. 7, no. 1, pp. 38-41, by Rebecca Clarren.

America's first Immigrants, Smithsonian, November 2004, vol. 35, no. 8, pp. 90-98, by Evan Hadingham.

Save the holes, Los Angeles Times Magazine, August 8, 2004, pp. 12-13, 30-32, by Rebecca Clarren.

Island hopping to a New World, U.S. News and World Report, February 23 - March 1, 2004, vol. 136, no. 7, pp. 54-55, by Alex Markels.

The Coast Road, Nature, March 6, 2003, pp. 10-12, by Rex Dalton.

Underneath Alaska, Sierra, March/April 2003, pp. 34-39 & 66-67, by Bruce Brewer.

Bygone Bears of Prince of Wales Island, Alaska Science Forum, November 3, 1993, Article 1158, http://www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF11/1158.html, by Carla Helfferich.

The karst cops: volunteers find and map the caves of the Tongass, Alaska, November 2001, pp. 28-34, by Nick Jans.

Inside Alaska, Highlights for Children, February 2001, pp. 16-17, by Rob Knotts.

The dawn of humans: hunt for the first Americans, National Geographic, December 2000, pp. 40-67, by Michael Parfit.

The last ice age wasn't totally icy, Science News, November 11, 2000, p. 317.

Did they come by sea?, American Archaeology, Spring 2000, pp. 24-30, by Tom Koppel.

Mystery of the First Americans, NOVA Television Broadcast #2705, February 15, 2000.

Forest on the rocks: a limestone habitat in Alaska is threatened by clear-cutting, Natural History, March 1999, pp. 46-53, by Jim Malusa.

Ancient Alaskan bones may help to prove coast migration theory, Mammoth Trumpet, October 1997, pp. 8-12 & 20, by Carol Ann Lysek.

The geological, glacial and cultural history of southern Southeast, Alaska Geographic, 1997, vol. 24, no. 1, pp. 6-31, by Jim Baichtal, Greg Streveler, and Terence Fifield.

9,700-year-old bones back the theory of coastal migration, New York Times National, October 6, 1996, p. 32, by Karen Freeman.

Study reveals POW history, Prince of Wales Island Guide 1994, pp. 7 & 11.

Caving beneath the Tongass, BioScience, April 1994, pp. 215-218.

A glimmer of hope for coastal migration, Science, February 25, 1994, pp. 1088-1089, by Lisa Busch.

Silence of the caves: the lowdown on Alaska's secret underworld, Alaska, January 1993, pp. 22-29 & 71, by Jeannie Woodring.

Cave explorers discover 10,000-year-old grizzly, We Alaskans (Anchorage Daily News Magazine), August 30, 1992, pp. D12-D13, by Doug O'Harra.

Books that Mention the Research

The Bald Eagle's View of American History, by C. H. Colman, 2006, Charlesbridge, 48 pp.

Who Came First? New Clues to Prehistoric Americans, by Patricia Lauber, 2003, National Geographic Children's Books, 64 pp.

Lost World: Rewriting Prehistory--How New Science is Tracing America's Ice Age Mariners, by Tom Koppel, 2003, Atria Books, 300 pp.

Wild Man Island (fiction), by Will Hobbs, 2002, Harper Collins Publishers, 184 pp.

Bones: Discovering the First Americans, by Elaine Dewar, 2001, Random House Canada, 628 pp.

Last Stands: A Journey Through North America's Vanishing Ancient Rainforests, by Larry Pynn, 2000, Oregon State University Press, 212 pp.

Skull Wars: Kennewick Man, Archaeology, and the Battle for Native American Identity, by David Hurst Thomas, 2000, Basic Books, 326 pp.

Bones, Boats & Bison: Archaeology and the First Colonization of Western North America, by E. James Dixon, 1999, University of New Mexico Press, 322 pp.

   
© 2004 by Timothy H. Heaton