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NEW FACES

LTC Michelle Bunkers

was

named chair of USD’s Department

of Military Science in August 2015.

The Dell Rapids, South Dakota,

native has returned to campus

with 22 years of U.S. Army service

under her belt; Bunkers graduated

from USD’s ROTC program in

1993 with an English major and a

military science minor. Her M.S. in strategic intelligence is

from National Defense Intelligence University (2010) and her

duty stations include Stuttgart, Germany; Fort Huachuca,

Arizona; Fort Bragg, North Carolina; Presidio of Monterey

and MacDill Air Force Base, Florida, with deployments

including a tour in Iraq and two tours in Afghanistan.

Donald R. Easton-Brooks,

Ph.D.

has been named dean of the School of

Education at the University of South

Dakota. Easton-Brooks spent two

years at Eastern Oregon University as

a professor and dean of the Colleges

of Business and Education. He is a

1988 graduate of Greenville College in

Greenville, Illinois, with a bachelor’s

degree in sociology, a master’s degree in early childhood special

education from the University of Colorado at Denver and a

doctorate in education leadership and innovation from UC-

Denver. Easton-Brooks’ research and scholarship includes urban

education, ethnic-matching of students and teachers, minority

education and teacher diversity. Professionally, he has been a

member of the American Educational Research Association,

the National Association for Multicultural Education and the

National Black Child Development Institute.

AROUND CAMPUS

MILITARY SCIENCE

SCHOOL OF EDUCATION

In-State Tuition for Out-of-State Coyotes

Qualification is simple: incoming freshmen or

transfer students can pay the in-state tuition

rate if a parent or legal guardian received

a degree from USD, making a world-class

education even more affordable.

See

www.usd.edu/childofalumni

for further details.

Children of USD alumni can now attend

the university for in-state tuition,

even if they don’t live in South Dakota.